Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Lake Maracaibo, 1823

  1. #1

    Default Lake Maracaibo, 1823

    Morning all, a long shot question but has anyone found an order of Battle for the battle of Lake Maracaibo, July 24th 1823? I can find a few references that describe the general course of the battle but nothing concrete on the ships engaged.

    PS - thanks autocorrect for buggering up the title!! :angry:

  2. #2
    Admiral of the Blue.
    Baron
    England

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Notts
    Log Entries
    15,984
    Blog Entries
    22
    Name
    Rob

    Default

    Not sure if this would lead you anywhere Dave?
    You need to sign up to read it free on line.

    https://www.jstor.org/stable/2008665...n_tab_contents

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  3. #3

    Default

    Yes that's one of the references I have, light on OOB info unfortunately. Thanks for posting it though

  4. #4
    Able Seaman
    United States

    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    VA
    Log Entries
    85
    Name
    James

    Default

    David,

    Found this website. It was in Spanish but my browser translated it. First paragraph I copied, lists the vessels involved. Will probably need to research each more for details.

    https://web.archive.org/web/20051120...l_del_lago.htm

    Freed on July 24, 1823, it was a decisive action in the naval campaigns of Independence. In this battle, the republican squad led by General José Prudencio Padilla, commander of the third Department of the Navy and of operations on Zulia, and the royalist commanded by the captain of the ship Ángel Laborde y Navarro, Commander of the Puerto Cabello station and Second Chief of the Spanish Navy on the Costa Firme. The patriot squad was made up of brigantines: Independiente, Mars, Fama, Confianza and Gran Bolívar; the schooners: Espartana, Independencia, Manuela, Chitty, Emprendedora, Aventina, Peacock, Antonia Manuela and Leona. As for the royalist forces, they were made up of the San Carlos brig, the schooner brigantines: Esperanza y Riego or Marathon; the gull schooner Especuladora; those of velacho: María Salvadora, Estrella, Cora, Mariana, Rayo, María Habanera and Zulia; the flecheras: Atrevida and Maracaibera; the pailebotes: Guajira and Monserrat, the feluccas: Resistencia, Mercedes, Brillante, Relámpago and Pedrito and the canoes: Raya, Duende, Palomera, Esperanza, Félix María, Altagracia, San Francisco and Corbeta, with a total of 49 cannons, 14 carronades , 4 howitzers, troop individuals, and 670 seamen, including chiefs and officers.

  5. #5
    Admiral of the Blue.
    Baron
    England

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Notts
    Log Entries
    15,984
    Blog Entries
    22
    Name
    Rob

    Default

    Better late than never Dave, I just noticed in your first post that you needed a cherry picker.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  6. #6
    Able Seaman
    United States

    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    VA
    Log Entries
    85
    Name
    James

    Default

    I finally started going through the 'historical' historical discussions ��. Hopefully will be useful, or good to have on the record.

  7. #7
    Able Seaman
    United States

    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Location
    VA
    Log Entries
    85
    Name
    James

    Default

    Not sure what role, if any, British sailors played in Venezuela's fight for independence, but some general resources on British involvement in the Latin American revolutions of that time.

    Harvey, Robert. "Liberators: Latin America`s Struggle For Independence, 1810–1830". John Murray, London (2000). ISBN 0-7195-5566-3

    Higgins, James (editor). The Emancipation of Peru: British Eyewitness Accounts, 2014. Online at https://sites.google.com/site/jhemanperu

    Moises Enrique Rodriguez, Freedom's Mercenaries: British Volunteers in the Wars of Independence of Latin America (1810–1825), (Lanham, Maryland, 2006).

  8. #8

    Default

    Thanks James :)

  9. #9
    Midshipman
    Spain

    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Almeria
    Log Entries
    168
    Name
    Ferrante

    Default

    Nice topic . It was a decisive battle for the New Granada and Venezuela Independence
    In 1820 there was an insurrection in Spain . Some spanish military forces going to reinforce this area military staged a coup . And they took over the Spaniard the Spaniard

    I am sure that the British legion supported this battle :
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Legions

    Some pics :


    Name:  C224FE91-406D-4947-9572-CCCEBF192579.png
Views: 30
Size:  530.0 KB

    Spaniards with winds against sails .

    Name:  216D1BB1-6594-48A5-A3C6-BF8BFBA68905.jpg
Views: 30
Size:  160.8 KB
    Last edited by Ferrante; 04-23-2020 at 23:22.

  10. #10
    Admiral of the Blue.
    Baron
    England

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Notts
    Log Entries
    15,984
    Blog Entries
    22
    Name
    Rob

    Default

    Looks like my Chilean Navy may be getting repurposed with a change of flags in the future then.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  11. #11

    Default

    Interesting article about the Napoleonic veterans in South America.

  12. #12
    Midshipman
    Spain

    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    Almeria
    Log Entries
    168
    Name
    Ferrante

    Default

    I have found the order squad from the Colombian ships . Take a look to the surnames :



    1) Brig Independiente, Capitán de Navío Renato Beluche
    2) Brig Confianza, Teniente de Navío Pedro Urribarrí
    3) Schooner Antonia Manuela, Cap. J. Rastigue de Bellegarde
    4) Schooner Manuela Chitty, Alférez Félix Romero
    5) Schooner Peacock, Teniente de Fragata Clemente Castell
    6) Schooner Emprendedora, Alférez Tomás Vega
    7) Schooner Independencia, Capitán de Fragata Samuel Pilot
    8) Schooner Leona, John Mc. Cann
    9) Schooner Espartana, Capitán Marcy Mankin
    10) Brig Marte, Capitán de Navío Nicholas Joly

  13. #13
    Admiral of the Blue.
    Baron
    England

    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Notts
    Log Entries
    15,984
    Blog Entries
    22
    Name
    Rob

    Default

    I believe that the Schooner Independencia may be the same ship that was previously in Corcoran’s Chilean squadron. It seems to ring a bell that she was sold on to Colombia.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •