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Thread: I'm taking the plunge, slowly.

  1. #1
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    Default I'm taking the plunge, slowly.

    I've finally decided to slowly get into creating landscapes and painting my own models. I'm starting with some fine terrain acquired from eBay.

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    I thought I'd start with some fortifications rather than jumping right into ships.

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    Any advice? Anything I should know about prepping and painting this one?

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  2. #2
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    I use Squadron Putty to fill any imperfections.

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    I use Krylon primer as an undercoat. I use the color closest to what the actual paint will be. It has nice coverage and dries fast for instant gratification.

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    Fort Louvois puttied and primered.

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    The lone cannon is my token finished scratch-built gun. More to come as time permits.
    Last edited by Dobbs; 07-07-2019 at 05:28.

  3. #3
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    The first thing you should do to any resin models is wash them and let them soak in washing up liquid water. I use an old tooth brush to get into corners. This ensures that any mold release agent is removed. It will prevent your primer from getting hold of the model if left on. Then once dry, you can't do better than follow the advice Dobbs has just posted.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    The first thing you should do to any resin models is wash them and let them soak in washing up liquid water. I use an old tooth brush to get into corners. This ensures that any mold release agent is removed. It will prevent your primer from getting hold of the model if left on.
    Aww, jeez, I knew that and I still didn't do it! Well, here's hoping my primer choice is as good as I said...

  5. #5
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    All washed and scrubbed, waiting to prime. I'll be using a grey Vallejo liquid primer though, mostly because I already purchased it.

  6. #6
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    While many of you seem to be producing replicas of Mediterranean and Caribbean fortifications, I'm going to be taking by cues from Prince of Wales Fort in Manitoba, Canada and other North American sites:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prince_of_Wales_Fort

  7. #7
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    Great start! Keep posting your progress, please! I've had a few materials to make some coasts for a while; maybe I should get inspired to begin working on them also ;D

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by pajaromuerto View Post
    Great start! Keep posting your progress, please! I've had a few materials to make some coasts for a while; maybe I should get inspired to begin working on them also ;D
    Unfortunately, I can't claim any responsibility for the islands themselves, they were made by an eBay vendor. I'm just trying to put together some things to put on them!

  9. #9
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    Here are a couple of different forts Jason.

    Fort St Pedro and Niebla in Chile.

    https://sailsofglory.org/content.php...t-Pedro-Island

    https://sailsofglory.org/content.php?28-Construction-of-Fort-Niebla

    Rob.
    Last edited by Bligh; 07-13-2019 at 00:55.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    Here are a couple of different forts Jason.

    Fort St Pedro and Niebla in Chile.

    https://sailsofglory.org/content.php...t-Pedro-Island

    https://sailsofglory.org/content.php?28-Construction-of-Fort-Niebla

    Rob.
    Very cool. I find that there's a difference, probably because of the available stone, between the looks of these and those in much of North America. Ideally, I'd like to produce something color-wise that would look at home on the Northern Atlantic Coast or Great Lakes of North America.

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    I would welcome any advice on getting the grey limestone/granite(?) and lichen look of one of these.
    Last edited by jasonb; 07-14-2019 at 23:57.

  12. #12
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    I've also used brushed on grey liquid primer, which is looking good so far but lighter than I expected.

  13. #13
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    Are you after something more like this Jason.


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    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  14. #14
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    Very much so. Am I right in remembering you built this for the Seven Years War? (Is it Ticonderoga?)

    Here's a picture of the Hudson's Bay Company fort I linked to earlier:

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    Last edited by jasonb; 07-15-2019 at 11:37.

  15. #15
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    Yes it is Ti Jason. Looks very similar to that Hudson bay Fort but with the remaining counter scarp still very much in evidence and more internal buildings.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  16. #16
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    I'm not sure the fort ever had more than what you see. I believe the ground underneath the fort is permafrost and would have been very challenging to excavate.
    Last edited by jasonb; 07-15-2019 at 14:09.

  17. #17
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    Scarp and a counterscarp are the inner and outer sides of a ditch or moat used in fortifications. Attackers must descend the counterscarp and ascend the scarp. In permanent fortifications the scarp and counterscarp may be encased in stone.

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    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  18. #18
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    You can also just see the Berm on my lower picture of Ti.

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    A berm is a level space, shelf, or raised barrier separating two areas. It can serve as a fortification line, a border/separation barrier.
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    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  19. #19
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    Oops, I looked it up and edited my last comment before I saw these. I'm not sure the fort ever had more than what you see. I believe the ground underneath the fort is permafrost and would have been very challenging to excavate.

  20. #20
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    Samuel Hearne's sketch of the fort doesn't look like there's any ditch or such surrounding it, but maybe I'm just not recognizing what I'm looking at.

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  21. #21
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    There is certainly a Scarp slope facing the pair of figures.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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    Are you sure that's not just a slope down to the water you can see on the right? In the 18th century, the fort was much closer to the water.

  23. #23
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    The angle looks correct for parallel fire from the walls. Plus you can see a corner of the covered way where the two posts stick up.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  24. #24
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    I see.

  25. #25
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    Any painting tips?

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    Jason, I see you've bought the fort from brigademodels. I have used that fort some time for my models.
    I painted it always in light brown tones and then I gave it a wash with gray ink. Finally a dry brush for all corners.
    I would have liked that brigademodels had textured the walls. The walls are smooth and monotonous, but it does not mean that it is a good piece of modeling.

    When I have some time I have to finish the ravelins of my fort that I know Rob is waiting for

  27. #27
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    That is very kind of you Julián.

    My games room should be finished tomorrow.
    I just got the game board lipped today, so I will have time to start on those Island forts at last.
    As for the grey or stone type walls, you can always mix a bit of fine modelling sand or textured material with your paint. That gives a fine pitted surface to the model. Dry brushing over it then highlights the irregularities.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  28. #28
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    I'm not great at taking these pictures, but here's the final product. I don't know if Brigade Models changed their mold, but mine was textured, though not in a way that resembles brick or stone. Overall, I think it looks a bit more like cement than stone, but it'll do -- not too bad for a first try!

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  29. #29
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    One thing that I do to perk them up a bit Jason is drill a hole, usually in one of the bastions depending on the fort, and plant a flag. You can change it at will and take it in for night actions.
    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    One thing that I do to perk them up a bit Jason is drill a hole, usually in one of the bastions depending on the fort, and plant a flag. You can change it at will and take it in for night actions.
    Rob.
    I like that idea. I might even need to get an HBC flag for kicks.

  31. #31
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    This may be of interest.

    The historical flag most associated with Hudson’s Bay Company is the modified Red Ensign of the British Royal Navy, which features a red field with the Union Jack in the upper left-hand corner. To the lower right hand of the central field are the letters HB C in white; the "H"" and B" are joined together as a single device.

    Prince Rupert, first Governor of HBC, was also Vice Admiral of England. By a special warrant dated July 21, 1682, he granted the Company permission to use the modified Ensign at its forts and on its ships entering Hudson Strait. No other private enterprise was ever granted such a privilege.

    The ones we are interested in are.

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    Before the 1801 Union.

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    After the Union.


    Hudson’s Bay Company has also used a version of the HBC coat of arms as a flag, rendered in colour on a field of white.

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    This flag is known as The Governor’s Standard, occasionally used as the house flag, and has been in use since 1779. Originally it was flown to indicate the presence of the Governor at a specific location, much as the Royal Standard indicates the presence of the monarch. In 1970 HBC adopted Governor's Standard as its Company flag, to be flown where practicable from Company buildings alongside the Canadian flag. It was considered to be more distinctive than the red HBC ensign, which is often confused with various other flags.

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    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bligh View Post
    Are you after something more like this Jason.


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    Rob.
    What game is this for?

  33. #33
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    That is my model of fort Ticondaroga. I have used it in both the French and Indian wars and also for AWI.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

  34. #34
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    Which rules system, I mean.

  35. #35
    Admiral of the Blue.
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    Mainly a very old set called "Rebellion in the Colonies" no longer in print as far as I know, and "Washington's Wars" by David Hoffman.
    Also when they fit the requirement "Redcoat" by Scotty Bowden which includes a Campaign map and rules.
    Then there is also "Liberty or Death" by Southerland and Gross.

    Rob.
    The Business of the commander-in-chief is first to bring an enemy fleet to battle on the most advantageous terms to himself, (I mean that of laying his ships close on board the enemy, as expeditiously as possible); and secondly to continue them there until the business is decided.

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